Gun sale background checks demanded at Sevier Park

Retired Metro Police Commander Robert Nash, local gun owners and the gun control advocacy group Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America’s Nashville chapter held a press conference May 29 in Sevier Park calling for expanded background checks on gun sales.

Participants demanded that Tennessee Senators Alexander and Corker change their position on the bi-partisan Manchin-Toomey amendment, which expands background checks in order to prevent felons and the mentally ill from purchasing guns. The amendment came within six votes of overcoming a gun-industry endorsed filibuster on April 17 and will be voted on again.

Vanderbilt University’s recent poll of registered voters in Tennessee shows that 80% of gun owners and 85% of non-gun owners support background checks on all gun purchases, including during gun shows and private sales. A similar Middle Tennessee State University poll last February found that 85% favor such checks.

Speakers will include retired East Police Precinct Commander Robert Nash, Franklin resident and Metro firefighter and gun owner Chris Polk,  Gallatin resident and Volunteer State Community College professor and gun safety instructor Len Assante and Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America Nashville Co-Chair Kathleen Chandler Wright. Gun safety activist Linda McFadyen-Ketchum will moderate the event.

Sevier Park is located at 3000 Granny White Pike. The event will be held in the picnic pavilion near the playground.

For more information, contact Linda McFadyen-Ketchun at 615-504-3822. Wednesday’s on-site media contact is Melanie Fields, 615-202-6754.

Much like Mothers Against Drunk Driving was created to change laws regarding drunk driving, Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America <www.momsdemandaction.org> was created to build support for common-sense gun reforms. The nonpartisan grassroots movement of American mothers is demanding new and stronger solutions to lax gun laws and loopholes that jeopardize the safety of our children and families.

In just five months, the organization has more than 100,000 members with more than 90 local chapters in 40 states across the country.