MED Week wraps up

Last updated on December 19th, 2014 at 10:54 am

At MED Week closing event, l-r: Angela Crane-Jones, Sedgewick Lloyd, Michelle Lane, Alexander Coure, Davita Taylor, Bryan E. Lillard, and Marilyn Robinson. Photo by Cass Teague

At MED Week closing event, l-r: Angela Crane-Jones, Sedgewick Lloyd, Michelle Lane, Alexander Coure, Davita Taylor, Bryan E. Lillard, and Marilyn Robinson. Photo by Cass Teague

The Nashville Minority Business Center (MBC) wrapped up this year’s MED Week events at the offices of Baker Donelson in downtown Nashville. This year’s annual Minority Enterprise Development Week (MED Week) held most of their programming in the Baker Donelson Conference Center, 211 Commerce Street, making it convenient for attendees to maximize their participation in a variety of well-planned sessions designed to foster success in small businesses owned and/or operated by minorities.

“Power Networking and Business Expo was well attended,” said Organizer Marilyn Robinson, director of the MBC. “Baker Donelson is commended for granting the use of their state of the art venue.”

The first event of this year’s annual MED Week was held on November 6, a Business Matchmaking for Construction event designed to boost small business growth. The MBC also hosted seminars on December 3 to benefit businesses and those seeking business information.

“David Humes known as ‘The Happiness Guy’ gave great productivity tips. His one-hour teaser was enough for me to purchase his CDs to start off 2015,” said Robinson.

Mike Coleman’s ‘Social Media Strategies to Grow Your Business’ talked about what social networks to use for your business or nonprofit, and getting ready to take the next step—also about using a couple of the more popular social networks with a closer look at the popular social media networks like Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn. This information-packed seminar demonstrated how social media can help a business, with plenty of time to ask questions, share experiences, and network with peers, with real-world insights and knowledge to help their business succeed.

“The social media workshop could have lasted at least four hours instead of 90 minutes,” said Robinson. “We definitely need to plan quarterly social media workshops to keep up with the latest changes.”

“The IRS advocate for the state of Tennessee, Jenny Sullivan, gave us several insider tips that will be useful in counseling small business owners that run into challenging taxpayer situations,” said Robinson.

Sullivan is currently the acting local taxpayer advocate of Tennessee. Taxpayer Advocate Service is an independent organization within the IRS, with at least one Local Taxpayer Advocate in each state. Jenny has been with the IRS for 28 years.

The service is free, confidential and is available to businesses as well as individuals.

“The Academy at Hickory Hollow, a school of MNPS hosted by Simon Foundation, is one of Nashville’s best kept secrets,” said Robinson. “The students and faculty were highly engaged with our presenters, Joe Turner, owner and president of Universal Electronics; George Thomas, founder of Education Equal Opportunity Group, Inc.; and James Jenkins, former football professional and SBA professional.”

Robinson was also honored to receive a gold record from Corinthian Missionary Baptist Church, Rev. Enoch Fuzz pastor, marking 30 years of minority business development and advocacy in Nashville.

2014 MED Week Sponsors included: HCA/TriStar Health, Baker Donelson, Regions Bank, R.H. Boyd Publishing Corporation, Crosslin & Associates, Inc., and The Ryman Hospitality Properties Foundation Inc.