Max sheds light on military canine history

Max (Photo: Warner Bros.)

Max (Photo: Warner Bros.)

For years the military has used canine companions in warfare operations. When we say “thank you for your service” to human service members, that courtesy should be extended to the four-legged service dogs as well. Since ancient times, dogs have been used in warfare and not just for U.S. forces.

Max was released to general audiences on June 26 in theatres everywhere. The fictional light hearted, very entertaining movie about Max the Belgian Malinois, (one breed of the German Sheppard) depicts a story about love life and the toil of war for a Texas based USMC Family and their son’s service commitment to the end.

He is a beautiful precision-trained military dog serving on the frontlines in Afghanistan alongside his handler, U.S. Marine Kyle Wincott.

As things go terribly wrong on their maneuvers, Kyle is mortally wounded and Max, traumatized by the loss of his best friend, is unable to remain in service.

After all, Max has only known to serve, and without serving his Marine pal Kyle, he is clearly lost.

Once Max is shipped home to stateside, he meets the only human he seems willing to connect with at Kyle’s funeral. That ends up being Justin, Kyle’s teenage brother. A troubled teen with some serious defiance issues, Justin ends up taking responsibility for Max and a new loving bond is formed between the angry displaced dog and the kindred spirited Justin.

At first it seemed like Justin and his mom and dad bit off more than they could chew and hope dwindles. However, Max becomes the only chance for them to discover what really happened to Kyle that day. The movie will keep audiences on the edge of their seats anticipating ‘what’s next’ as a series of twists and turns to the plot draw them in.

Max director Boaz Yakin says it was crucial to find a star pooch to headline the film, so five different dogs were used to make the movie. But the star of the show is a three-year dog old named ‘Carlos.’

Max is rated PG for action violence, peril, brief language and some thematic elements. Running time is one hour, 51 minutes.