Musicians Hall of Fame opens GRAMMY Museum Gallery

Cutting the ribbon,(l-r): Mike Curb, Bob Santelli, Joe Chambers, Mayor Megan Barry, Neil Portnow, Brenda Lee, Peter Frampton, and Butch Syyridon.  photo by Cass Teague

Cutting the ribbon,(l-r): Mike Curb, Bob Santelli, Joe Chambers, Mayor Megan Barry, Neil Portnow, Brenda Lee, Peter Frampton, and Butch Syyridon. photo by Cass Teague

The GRAMMY Museum® at L.A. LIVE and the Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum held a ribbon-cutting for the GRAMMY Museum Gallery™ at the Musicians Hall of Fame Tuesday, March 29. Special guests included Nashville Mayor Megan Barry; Bob Santelli, Executive Director of the GRAMMY Museum at L.A. LIVE; Neil Portnow, President/CEO of The Recording Academy®; Mike Curb, philanthropist and music industry executive; Brenda Lee; and Peter Frampton. The Grand Opening celebration is Saturday, April 2 from 10 am to 5 pm, with half-price admission, live music, giveaways, musician meet and greets, food trucks, and musical arts and crafts.

“The Musicians Hall of Fame has taken Municipal Auditorium to new heights, and the GRAMMY Museum Gallery will take both of them to another level,” said Mayor Barry. “These places capture the musical creativity that makes Nashville unique and that contributes so much to our economy — ten billion dollars a year for our region and 56,000 jobs. With the GRAMMY Museum Gallery here, visitors will have yet another reason to visit Nashville.”

The GRAMMY Museum Gallery is an interactive facility for Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum visitors. It allows guests to explore the history of the GRAMMY Awards®, and allows all ages to be onstage and interact with every aspect of the recording process.

“Kids will love all the interactive opportunities to learn about recording and performing,” said Mayor Barry. “And adults are going to geek out over the GRAMMY history along with all the amazing instruments and other memorabilia.”
With the privacy of headphones, visitors can play electric drums, keyboard, bass, and guitar, or sing along with Ray Charles and the Raelettes. Go behind the scenes in the studio, as exhibits for songwriting, engineering, and producing allow you to get in the booth and see what it takes to cut a record.

Interactive exhibits for singing, recording, and DJ’ing, and a recording studio and rehearsal room give you the full GRAMMY recording experience. The Gallery is a permanent exhibit, included in Hall admission.

“Our collection of iconic musical instruments that have been used in the studio and live by some of the greatest musicians in the world, coupled with the GRAMMY Museum Gallery’s state-of-the-art, interactive and educational booths, will be a great experience for all visitors to Music City,” said , Founder / Executive Director of the Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum.

Along with star players like Jimi Hendrix, the museum focuses on session musicians who played on thousands of iconic recordings from every decade starting in the 1950s. Sections of the museum focus on important cities in the history of American music,e.g. Detroit, Los Angeles, Muscle Shoals, Atlanta, Memphis, Nashville, exploring each’s contributions. Induction ceremonies and concerts honors new members, nominated by the American Federation of Musicians and other music industry professionals.

For more, call (615) 244-3263 or visit www.musicianshalloffame.com