You can help Siri become more intelligent

On October 14, 2011, Apple Inc. introduced Siri, a form of Artificial Intelligence, an intelligent personal assistant.

Siri can learn like people do—true intelligence. Artificial intelligence is the theory and development of computer systems to perform tasks that normally require human intelligence, such as speech recognition, visual perception, decision-making, and translation between languages. Siri is very capable. She can help you to set up your phone’s security. She can call, message, and email your contacts.

Siri has been included in Apple’s iOS, watch OS, macOS, and tvOS operating, iOS 10, Apple Inc.’s upcoming iPhone, and iPad Operating system.

In order to make Siri more intelligent, you have to understand her capabilities. This intelligent personal assistant can be taught more. You can control third-party app functions using the company’s voice-activated assistant.

According to Nathan Olivarez-Giles, the introduction of iOS 10 by Apple Inc. allowed Siri to control third-party app functions using the company’s voice-activated assistant. Among the first apps to yield to Siri are big names like WhatsApp, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Square Cash and Slack, along with lesser-known ones including Looklive and The Roll. Olivarez-Giles suggests that you say: “Siri, send Catherine $20 for lunch with cash,” and the Square Cash app will transmit the funds. (Note: your unique fingerprint is required to complete the transaction.)

If you say, “Hey Siri, send Jim Gonzalez a message in LinkedIn,” this request sends a direct message to a contact via the Microsoft Corp.-owned social network. Olivarez-Giles says that you should try to be specific when you interact with Siri. Say, “Siri, show me photos of what Kanye West wore to the VMA awards this year in Looklive.” This command will pull up pictures of the rapper’s wardrobe, along with links to buy what he was wearing, in the celebrity-shopping app. He found that telling Siri what to do was quicker than launching the app and carrying out the task with your fingers. At least it was in the demo experiments and will be for you.

Bonnie Cha said that she has a love-hate relationship with Siri, Apple’s voice-controlled digital assistant for iOS. On the one hand, Siri’s quite helpful when you need to do things like set reminders and compose text messages. On the other hand, it’s absolutely maddening when Siri repeatedly makes mistakes or can’t complete a task. That’s why some people get frustrated and give up on using Siri altogether.

But you shouldn’t be too quick to dismiss her. Voice assistants like Siri (and Google Now and Microsoft’s Cortana) can be useful and timesaving tools for getting things done and finding information. You just have to be willing to put in a little time and effort to better understand what Siri does and train her to be a smarter assistant.

If you just got an iPhone or haven’t really used Siri, it’s helpful to know what she can and can’t do. To find out, hold down the Home button and say, “What can you do?” Siri will then provide a list of sample questions and commands she understands, such as launching an application or asking for sports scores.

Alternatively, after you’ve activated Siri, you can tap the question mark icon in the lower left-hand corner and get the same results that way.

The first couple of times Siri misunderstands your commands, you’ll probably want to scream and drop kick your iPhone. (Or maybe that’s just me.) But have a little patience and give her a chance to learn from the mistakes.

If Siri misinterprets something, swipe down on the screen to reveal your initial command and then use the “Tap to edit” to correct the statement or question. Not only will she return with new results, she’ll also remember the correction to provide better performance in the future.

You can tell Siri how contacts are related to you, so you can say things like “Call my husband” instead of “Call Ryan Gosling.” To do so, say a command like “Text my boss,” then Siri will ask you, “What is your manager’s name?” Or you can say, “Walt Mossberg is my boss” and Siri will add that relationship to her records.

Along the same lines, you can tell Siri how contacts are related to you, so you can say things like “Call my husband” instead of “Call Ryan Gosling.” To do so, say a command like “Text my boss,” then Siri will ask you, “What is your manager’s name?” Or you can say, “Walt Mossberg is my boss” and Siri will add that relationship to her records.

Siri has become my go-to method for setting up reminders. Rather than opening up the Reminders app and manually entering all the information, I can just dictate it to Siri and she’ll create it for me. But she’s also smart in that she can remind you to do something based on your location.

Siri may not be perfect, but with a little effort on your part, she can help save you time and boost your productivity, and maybe even win you a bet.