Mayor John Cooper signs executive order declaring state of emergency

Mayor Cooper has signed Executive Order No. 4 to facilitate Metro’s swift tornado response and recovery efforts.

Mayor John Cooper has signed Executive Order No. 4, declaring an official State of Emergency in the immediate aftermath of the March 3rd tornado that caused death, injury, and widespread property damage in Davidson County.

The executive order streamlines Metro’s efforts in acquiring and distributing necessary supplies and services to affected residents. The Director of Finance is directed to monitor expenditure of funds by the Metropolitan Government related to the State of Emergency, prepare requests as appropriate for financial assistance and reimbursement of such expenditures by federal and state governments, and conduct a review of such expenditures following the conclusion of the State of Emergency.

“This executive order and State of Emergency declaration is a critical resource that will help facilitate Metro’s response and recovery efforts on behalf of all Nashvillians affected by this morning’s devastating storm,” said Mayor Cooper. “My administration is committed to matching the courage and strength of spirit shown by the tornado survivors I met with this morning, who serve as an example to us all. With solidarity, we begin the path forward to recovery.”

Metro’s Office of Emergency Management partners with multiple agencies to assist with recovery efforts. Residents who are interested in helping with recovery efforts are encouraged to reach out to members of the Disaster Relief Committee, which is comprised of local disaster relief agencies. The following are members who work closely with OEM during citywide emergencies:

American Red Cross phone: 615-250-4300. Website: <www.redcross.org/local/tennessee/local-chapters/nashville-area>.

The American Red Cross has a long history of providing assistance to disaster victims around the world and is the lead community agency responsible for sheltering and mass care services in Nashville. The Nashville Chapter American Red Cross will help identify and provide damage and needs assessment for disaster victims, and ensure that they have food, clothing, water, medications and other basic essentials.

Salvation Army phone: 615-242-0411. Website: <www.salarmy-nashville.org/>.

The Salvation Army has a long-standing history of ministering to children and families in Nashville, and would provide fixed and mobile feeding sites, clothing, bedding, lodging and other emergency aid to victims, if a disaster strikes. Also, the agency would provide casework and financial counseling services to families.

Second Harvest Food Bank — phone: 615-329-3491. Website: <secondharvestmidtn.org/>.

Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee fights hunger by providing food, services and education to 46 Middle and West Tennessee counties, including the Nashville Davidson County area. During a community crisis in Nashville, Second Harvest would help in the coordination of basic food items to areas that need it. The organization was formed to provide a central distribution center for companies, groups and individuals who want to help provide food to people in Middle Tennessee who are hungry. Second Harvest is part of a nationwide network of more than 200 food banks and food rescue programs throughout the United States. In Middle Tennessee, the agency distributes food to more than 500 non-profit partner agencies.

Community Foundation of Middle Tenn. —phone: 888-540-5200. Website: <www.cfmt.org/>.

The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee is the primary charitable repository for cash and would maintain ultimate authority and control over the Metro Disaster Response Fund, a program designed to meet the needs of our community during disaster. The agency would convene the Metro Disaster Response Fund Advisory Committee to evaluate requests for cash assistance and make distributions from the fund to tax-exempt, nonprofit organizations assisting with efforts to rebuild the lives of individuals and families affected by a local disaster – both immediately and long-term. The committee is comprised of a designated representative from the Mayor’s Office, The Office of Emergency Management, Interdenominational Ministerial Fellowship, United Way of Metropolitan Nashville, Middle Tennessee Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (MD TN VOAD), business community, and representatives with the Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee.

Crisis Center/2-1-1 — phone: 211. Website: <tn211.mycommunitypt.com/>.

The Crisis Center/2-1-1 has been a critical partner in Nashville’s emergency and crisis response efforts for more than 35 years. When a disaster strikes, Nashville will rely on the Crisis Center and its recently created 211 division to connect disaster victims to the services they need. Whether it is food, shelter, counseling, or other social service needs, 211 is specifically designed to connect people with more than 2,800 health and human services agencies. All 211 calls are answered by nationally certified information and referral specialists who are fluent in several different languages. The caller is provided with phone numbers, programs and services, location, hours of operation and other information relevant to what the caller needs.

Hands On Nashville phone: 615-298-1108. Website: <www.hon.org>.

Often, during a community crisis, people are eager to volunteer their time and energy to help communities recover. During a disaster, the Mayor’s Office of Emergency Management would rely on Hands on Nashville to connect volunteers with people and agencies that need help. Hands on Nashville links volunteers with available volunteer opportunities and helps coordinate large-scale volunteer efforts.