Faith-based organizations eligible to participate in Paycheck Protection and Economic Injury Disaster Loan programs

SBA Administrator Jovita Carranza has announced that the SBA issued guidance clarifying that all faith-based organizations impacted by Coronavirus (COVID-19) are eligible to participate in the Paycheck Protection Program and the Economic Injury Disaster Loan program, without restrictions based on their religious identity or activities, to the extent they meet the eligibility criteria outlined in the CARES Act that was passed by Congress, signed into law by President Trump, and implemented by the Paycheck Protection Act Interim Final Rule.

“Following the passage of the emergency economic relief assistance, the Administration and Congress acted to ensure that small businesses and non-profits alike have access to critical funds to keep their workers paid and employed,” said Carranza. “Faith-based organizations have always provided critical social services for people in need, and SBA will make clear that these organizations may access this emergency capital.”

The Paycheck Protection Program is designed to keep small business workers employed and provide small businesses with capital through the nation’s banks and other lending institutions, with support from the SBA. The Paycheck Protection Program’s maximum loan amount is $10 million with a fixed one percent interest rate and maturity of two years. SBA will forgive the portion of loan proceeds used for payroll costs and other designated operating expenses for up to eight weeks provided at least 75% of loan proceeds are used for payroll costs.

The Economic Injury Disaster Loan program provides qualifying small businesses and non-profits with working capital up to $2 million with low interest rates and terms extending up to 30 years.
“While every American is being affected by COVID-19, the impact of this pandemic is particularly hurting our schools and places of worship, and disproportionately impacting the underrepresented communities, the sick, the elderly and the lower income,” said Carranza. “It’s vitally important that organizations focused on delivering critical social services and meeting community needs remain viable, particularly during this economically challenging time.”

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